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Leviathan

Thomas Hobbes Thomas Hobbes • Aug 11th, 2017 (Unlimited edition)

Leviathan
Leviathan
T. Hobbes

The writings that made the modern world.

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Length:
About 16 hours read.
1232 leafs
Price: FREE

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About the Book

Leviathan rigorously argues that civil peace and social unity are best achieved by the establishment of a commonwealth through social contract. Hobbes's ideal commonwealth is ruled by a sovereign power responsible for protecting the security of the commonwealth and granted absolute authority to ensure the common defense. In his introduction, Hobbes describes this commonwealth as an "artificial person" and as a body politic that mimics the human body.

The frontispiece to the first edition of Leviathan, which Hobbes helped design, portrays the commonwealth as a gigantic human form built out of the bodies of its citizens, the sovereign as its head. Hobbes calls this figure the "Leviathan," a word derived from the Hebrew for "sea monster" and the name of a monstrous sea creature appearing in the Bible; the image constitutes the definitive metaphor for Hobbes's perfect government. His text attempts to prove the necessity of the Leviathan for preserving peace and preventing civil war.


Table of Contents

PART I. OF MAN

PART II. OF COMMON-WEALTH

PART III. OF A CHRISTIAN COMMON-WEALTH


About the Author

An English philosopher who is considered one of the founders of modern political philosophy, 5 April 1588 – 4 December 1679, England.